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Everything You Don't Know About Tipping - Wait But Why

iliftthingsupandputthemd0wn:

PSA on tipping. After spending last year working at Dunkin Donuts as I applied to medical schools, I really learned the value of giving a good tip. Not saying that you need to go extremely out of your way to tip but I know the few extra bucks I made helped out a ton.

neurosciencestuff:

Loneliness impacts DNA repair: The long and the short of telomeres
Telomeres are DNA-protein complexes that function as protective caps at the ends of chromosomes. Biologists and veterinarians at the Vetmeduni Vienna recently examined the telomere length of captive African grey parrots. They found that the telomere lengths of single parrots were shorter than those housed with a companion parrot, which supports the hypothesis that social stress can interfere with cellular aging and a particular type of DNA repair. It suggests that telomeres may provide a biomarker for assessing exposure to social stress. The findings have been published in the open access journal PLOS ONE.
In captivity, grey parrots are often kept in social isolation, which can have detrimental effects on their health and wellbeing. So far there have not been any studies on the effects of long term social isolation from conspecifics on cellular aging. Telomeres shorten with each cell division, and once a critical length is reached, cells are unable to divide further (a stage known as ‘replicative senescence’). Although cellular senescence is a useful mechanism to eliminate worn-out cells, it appears to contribute to aging and mortality. Several studies suggest that telomere shortening is accelerated by stress, but until now, no studies have examined the effects of social isolation on telomere shortening.
Using molecular genetics to assess exposure to stress 
To test whether social isolation accelerates telomere shortening, Denise Aydinonat, a doctorate student at the Vetmeduni Vienna, conducted a study using DNA samples that she collected from African grey parrots during routine check-ups. African greys are highly social birds, but they are often reared and kept in isolation from other parrots (even though such conditions are illegal in Austria). She and her collaborators compared the telomere lengths of single birds versus pair-housed individuals with a broad range of ages (from 1 to 45 years). Not surprisingly, the telomere lengths of older birds were shorter compared to younger birds, regardless of their housing. However, the important finding of the study was that single-housed birds had shorter telomeres than pair-housed individuals of the same age group.
Reading signs of stress by erosion of DNA 
“Studies on humans suggest that people who have experienced high levels of social stress and deprivation have shorter telomeres,” says Dustin Penn from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology at the Vetmeduni Vienna. “But this study is the first to examine the effects of social isolation on telomere length in any species.” Penn and his team previously conducted experiments on mice, which were the first to show that exposure to crowding stress causes telomere shortening. He points out that this new finding suggests that both extremes of social conditions affect telomere attrition. However, he also cautions “further ‘longitudinal’ studies, in which changes in telomeres of the same individuals over time, are needed to investigate the consequences of stress on telomere shortening and the subsequent effects on health and longevity.”
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neurosciencestuff:

Loneliness impacts DNA repair: The long and the short of telomeres

Telomeres are DNA-protein complexes that function as protective caps at the ends of chromosomes. Biologists and veterinarians at the Vetmeduni Vienna recently examined the telomere length of captive African grey parrots. They found that the telomere lengths of single parrots were shorter than those housed with a companion parrot, which supports the hypothesis that social stress can interfere with cellular aging and a particular type of DNA repair. It suggests that telomeres may provide a biomarker for assessing exposure to social stress. The findings have been published in the open access journal PLOS ONE.

In captivity, grey parrots are often kept in social isolation, which can have detrimental effects on their health and wellbeing. So far there have not been any studies on the effects of long term social isolation from conspecifics on cellular aging. Telomeres shorten with each cell division, and once a critical length is reached, cells are unable to divide further (a stage known as ‘replicative senescence’). Although cellular senescence is a useful mechanism to eliminate worn-out cells, it appears to contribute to aging and mortality. Several studies suggest that telomere shortening is accelerated by stress, but until now, no studies have examined the effects of social isolation on telomere shortening.

Using molecular genetics to assess exposure to stress

To test whether social isolation accelerates telomere shortening, Denise Aydinonat, a doctorate student at the Vetmeduni Vienna, conducted a study using DNA samples that she collected from African grey parrots during routine check-ups. African greys are highly social birds, but they are often reared and kept in isolation from other parrots (even though such conditions are illegal in Austria). She and her collaborators compared the telomere lengths of single birds versus pair-housed individuals with a broad range of ages (from 1 to 45 years). Not surprisingly, the telomere lengths of older birds were shorter compared to younger birds, regardless of their housing. However, the important finding of the study was that single-housed birds had shorter telomeres than pair-housed individuals of the same age group.

Reading signs of stress by erosion of DNA

“Studies on humans suggest that people who have experienced high levels of social stress and deprivation have shorter telomeres,” says Dustin Penn from the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology at the Vetmeduni Vienna. “But this study is the first to examine the effects of social isolation on telomere length in any species.” Penn and his team previously conducted experiments on mice, which were the first to show that exposure to crowding stress causes telomere shortening. He points out that this new finding suggests that both extremes of social conditions affect telomere attrition. However, he also cautions “further ‘longitudinal’ studies, in which changes in telomeres of the same individuals over time, are needed to investigate the consequences of stress on telomere shortening and the subsequent effects on health and longevity.”

westbor0baptistchurch:

emoij:

YELLOWSTONE ANIMALS FLEEING PARK. SUPERVOLCANO ERUPTION IMMINENT?

"At Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, there is a mass animal exodus underway. Miles of buffalo can be seen running frantically from the Northwest end of the park. They are even running down roads. Elk are also evacuating at an astounding rate. Smaller animals such as rabbits and squirrels are also fleeing Yellowstone. According to one expert, Thomas Lupshu, the only possible explanation is that the seismic activity in Yellowstone which has been increasing over the past month could mean that an eruption is on the way. " 

I’m pretty scared right now 

morons

Woo, finally a benefit from living in NC

heartcramp:

Look, if you nicely tell me that swearing makes you uncomfortable and you politely ask me not to, I will stop immediately and speak nicer than a nun.

But if you start acting like you’re on some fucking high horse, or telling me that I’m going to Hell for talking the way that I do and you can’t “be around that kind of language” then you can bet your motherfuckin’ ass that I’ll be fucking cussing like a cunt-fuckin’ sailor you maggot-ridden piece of dick.

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